Palm Sunday 2018

Today we celebrated Palm Sunday 2018. This was the day where Jesus triumphantly entered the city of Jerusalem. It is also the day that took place about a week prior to Jesus’ resurrection prior to his brutal crucifixion at the hand of the Romans.

We invite you to experience our 10:45AM worship service where Senior Pastor Rodney Maiden preached the following sermon:

“The Benefits From Jesus- Part I"


In the accounts of the four canonical Gospels, Jesus's triumphal entry into Jerusalem takes place about a week before his Resurrection.[7][8][9][10][11]

Christian theologians believe that the symbolism is captured prophetically in the Old Testament: Zechariah 9:9 "The Coming of Zion's King – See, your king comes to you, righteous and victorious, lowly and riding on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey". It suggests that Jesus was declaring he was the King of Israel to the anger of the Sanhedrin.

According to the Gospels, Jesus Christ rode a donkey into Jerusalem, and the celebrating people there laid down their cloaks and small branches of trees in front of him, and sang part of Psalm 118: 25–26... Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord. We bless you from the house of the Lord ....[2][7][8][9]

The symbolism of the donkey may refer to the Eastern tradition that it is an animal of peace, versus the horse, which is the animal of war.[1] A king would have ridden a horse when he was bent on war and ridden a donkey to symbolize his arrival in peace. Jesus's entry to Jerusalem would have thus symbolized his entry as the Prince of Peace, not as a war-waging king.[1][2]

“Flevit super illam” (He wept over it); by

Enrique Simonet

, 1892.

In Luke 19:41 as Jesus approaches Jerusalem, he looks at the city and weeps over it, foretelling the suffering that awaits the city in the events of the destruction of the Second Temple.

In many lands in the ancient Near East, it was customary to cover in some way the path of someone thought worthy of the highest honour. The Hebrew Bible (2 Kings 9:13) reports that Jehu, son of Jehoshaphat, was treated this way. Both the Synoptic Gospels and the Gospel of Johnreport that people gave Jesus this form of honour. In the synoptics the people are described as laying their garments and cut rushes on the street, whereas John specifies fronds of palm (Greek phoinix). In Jewish tradition, the palm is one of the Four Species carried for Sukkot, as prescribed for rejoicing at Leviticus 23:40.

In the Greco-Roman culture of the Roman Empire, which strongly influenced Catholic tradition, the palm branch was a symbol of triumph and victory. It became the most common attribute of the goddess Nike or Victory.[12] For contemporary Roman observers, the procession would have evoked the Roman triumph,[13] when the triumphator laid down his arms and wore the toga, the civilian garment of peace that might be ornamented with emblems of the palm.[14] Although the Epistles of Paul refer to Jesus as "triumphing", the entry into Jerusalem may not have been regularly pictured as a triumphal procession in this sense before the 13th century.[15] In ancient Egyptian religion, the palm was carried in funeral processions and represented eternal life. The palm branch later was used as a symbol of Christian martyrs and their spiritual victory or triumph over death.[16] In Revelation 7:9, the white-clad multitude stand before the throne and Lamb holding palm branches.

Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palm_Sunday

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